FIND  A  MOLD  PRO SELL  US  YOUR  HOUSE AVOID  FORECLOSURE DIY  BATHTUB  REFINISHING GARAGES
Black Mold Education ~ Home Improvement & Repair Projects & Articles ~ Do It Yourself Home Repair ~ Toxic Black Mold ~  How to Kill Toxic Black Mold ~ Mortgage Refinance ~ Contractors ~ We Buy Homes ~ Refinancing ~ We Buy Homes ~ Prescreened Contractors
Serving YOU since 1997

Do It Yourself Home Improvement
in West Houston & Katy, Texas

--
" We're Bettering YOUR Life by Improving Where YOU Live It "

Click on the links below to view Showcases of our latest Home Improvement work in the Houston / Katy, Texas area.

Kitchens & Bath

Patios & Pavers

Decks & Pergolas

Irrigation / Fencing

Interiors / Flooring

713-679-4175

HomeOur BlogContact Us

For a Free Estimate on Your Home Improvement & Remodeling Projects in the
Greater Houston and Katy, Texas area, Call or Text Us at 713-679-4175

Your Home

INTERIOR SHOWCASES
EXTERIOR SHOWCASES
DIY REFINISHING PAGES
DIY HOME PROJECTS
GREEN HOME SECTION
HINTS, TIPS & TRICKS

We Buy Homes

WE BUY HOMES FAST  
AVOID FORECLOSURE
STOP FORECLOSURE

Toxic Black Mold

BLACK MOLD EDUCATION
BLACK MOLD MAIN PAGE
D.I.Y. MOLD CLEAN UP
BLACK MOLD 4 DUMMIES
BLACK MOLD SOLUTIONS

Find a Home Pro
Over 5 Million Served

FULL LIST OF PROS
INTERIOR CONTRACTORS
EXTERIOR CONTRACTORS
DECKS & LANDSCAPE
HEATING / COOLING
MOLD TESTING PROS
BLACK MOLD REMOVAL
SCREENING PROCESS

The Corner Post

STORM / WEATHER PAGE
2013 JOBS AVAILABLE
PRIVACY STATEMENT
SITE DISCLAIMER
SITE MAP
-

-

Last Updated
03/08/14 07:55 PM

-
Do It Yourself Refinishing Kits      Refinishing Pictures
-
Refinishing Kit Procedures      Clawfoot Bathtub Refinishing

Clawfoot Tub Restoration From "Restoration Realities"
episode DRTR-108

PHOTO
PHOTO

The Dougherty home in the Grant Park neighborhood of Atlanta.

Tools, materials and safety equipment:

High-volume low-pressure spray gun
Palm sander
Pipe wrenches
Screwdrivers
Channel-lock pliers
Crescent wrench
Drop cloths
Integrity Refinishing Coatings primer, EP-acrylic top coat
Paint buckets and paint stirrers
Stripper (Methylene Chloride)
Lacquer Thinner
Acid-etch cleaner for porcelain
Degreaser for porcelain
Bonding agent for porcelain
Coarse steel wool
Masking tape
Water hose and sprayer nozzle
240 grit sandpaper
Scouring pad
Plastic bags
Tape
Rags
Plumbers putty
Respirator mask with organic-vapor filters
Safety Glasses
Chemical-resistant gloves
Chemical-resistant suit

PHOTO
Reglazing a Tub

The worn surface of the Dougherties' tub was actually painted with latex by former tenants, and the paint has begun to peel off. Aside from being unsightly and in improper surface for the tub, peeling paint presents a health-risk with small children in the home. Re-glazing the tub will involve removing the old paint, cleaning and degreasing the surface, adding a bonding primer and a gloss-finish coat of epoxy.

Paint removal is NOT necessary if the original manufacturers surface has not been painted over with any other type of paint.

  • Begin by shutting off both hot and cold water supplies (figure A).

     

  • Loosen and disconnect water supply lines and drain line.

     

  • Remove the tub to the garage or well vented location. Because cast-iron tubs like this typically weigh from 250 to 400 pounds, this part of the job requires several helpers (figure B).
    Photo

    Figure A

     
    Photo

    Figure B

     
    PHOTO

    For reglazing a tub, a respirator mask is required.
  • With the tub moved to a suitable work space, the stripping and re-glazing process can begin.

    Safety Alert: Because this process involves toxic chemicals and gives off fumes, this project should only be done outside or in a well-ventilated location, and appropriate safety precautions must be followed. In this case, protective eye-wear, chemical-resistant gloves, a respirator mask and full-coverage chemical resistant suit are all essential for proper safety. Your eyes and every part of your skin must be protected from these caustic chemicals. Respirator masks with organic-vapor filters must be used to avoid breathing harmful fumes.
     

  • The key to a good tub-refinishing job is good preparation. Cover the work area in plastic drop-cloths to protect surfaces and furniture from strippers and re-glazing chemicals.

     

  • Carefully remove the valves (figure C) as well as the pop-up or drain and overflow (if there is one).

     

  • Since our tub surface had been painted with latex, a paint stripper was needed to remove all the old paint. Following the manufacturer's instructions, spray on stripper using a pump sprayer (figure D).
    Photo

    Figure C

     
    Photo

    Figure D

     
  • Wait for the paint to begin bubbling up (figure E).

     

  • Scrub the loosened paint away with coarse steel wool (figure F).

     

  • Depending on the paint, as many as two more applications of stripper may be needed.
    Photo

    Figure E

     
    Photo

    Figure F

     
  • The next step of the process involves using methylene chloride -- or lacquer thinne -- which gives off strong fumes, so respirator masks (figure G) are required from this point.

     

  • Go over the entire tub with lacquer thinner and coarse steel wool to remove any remnants of paint.

     

  • After thoroughly scrubbing, rinse down the tub with water (figure H).
    Photo

    Figure G

     
    Photo

    Figure H

     
    PHOTO

    Figure I
    Important: Since the water runoff contains harmful chemicals, it's critical that you handle and dispose of the waste water properly. Make sure there is drainage into some type of receptacle that can be carefully disposed of. Check with your local authorities on proper disposal. For our project, we fashioned a makeshift drain using a spare piece of guttering that emptied into a plastic bucket (figure I).

     

    PHOTO

    Figure J
     

  • The chemical cleaners and degreasers prepare the surface for a chemical bonding agent that will chemically react with the paint to form a tough, long lasting, factory finish for porcelain and tile. The first treatment in this process is application of an acid-etch cleaner. (Protective eyewear and chemical-resistant gloves are required.)

     

  • Apply the acid-etch cleaner to the top edge of the tub (figure J) and allow it to run down over the surfaces.

     

  • With a scouring pad or 240 grit sandpaper, scrub the tub with the acid-etch cleaner and then rinse with water.
     
    PHOTO

    Figure K
    PHOTO

    Figure L
     

  • You're now ready to start the second step of the reglazing with the degreaser.

     

  • Add a little water to moisten the tub surface, and pour degreaser in the tub. This cleaner actually helped clean the corrosion and dirt from the copper drain (figure K).

     

  • Using another scouring pad, scrub away any residue.

     

  • Rinse with water.

     

  • To prepare for the next step, the adheser, cover any features of the tub that you won't be painting. In our case, this meant covering the metal claw-feet (figure L).
     
    PHOTO

    Figure M
    PHOTO

    Figure N
    PHOTO

    Figure O
     

  • The adheser is a bonding agent. Spray on a light film of the chemical adheser (figure M).

     

  • Allow to set up according to the manufacturer's instructions. In our case, the set-up time was 10 to15 minutes.

     

  • The next step is the primer. In our case the primer had to be mixed 1 part base to 2 parts reducer (figure N). This makes it possible to use in a paint sprayer. Mix thoroughly before placing the mixture into the sprayer.

     

  • Using a paint-spray gun, prime the tub, inside and out, with three light coats of primer.

     

  • Allow each coat to tack up about 15 minutes before the next coat is applied.

     

  • Paint-Sprayer Tip: When spraying, continually move the gun. Never allow it to set in one place (figure O).
     

  • The finish coat of paint is next. In our case, to use the sprayer, we mixed together a ratio of 4 parts glossy-white base to one part catalyst and two parts reducer (or thinner). We then mixed thoroughly and poured the mixture into the spray reservoir (figure P).

     

  • Again with a spray gun, apply three to four light coats of a final paint-coat (figure Q), allowing each coat to tack up about 15 minutes before the next coat is applied.
    Photo

    Figure P

     
    Photo

    Figure Q

     
     
  • Once the paint is completely dry, move the tub back into the bathroom (figure R), install the tub drain and reinstall the plumbing fixtures on refinished tub. Move into position to hookup water lines.

     

  • Size and cut drain pipe. Slide the connections together (figure S) and test.

     

  • Mark water line size. Use the pipe bender and form the bend to the fixture.

     

  • Hook up the compression fittings and test.
    Photo

    Figure R

     
    Photo

    Figure S

     
    PHOTO
    PHOTO
    PHOTO

    The Grant Park neighborhood in Atlanta.
Additional Tips on Re-Glazing a Tub

 

  • Do not use your re-glazed tub for the specified number of days or hours recommended by the manufacturer -- usually 24 hours.

     

  • Do not lay objects on your newly re-glazed tub. Soap, washcloths, and shampoo bottles can ruin the finish.

     

  • Avoid abrasive cleansers. Use a spray cleaner along with a soft cloth. Wiping the tub down with a cloth after each use can also help maintain the finish.

     

  • Avoid bath mats with suction cups underneath.

     

  • Maintain caulking around the tub.

     

  • Some manufacturers recommend waxing your re-glazed tub after it has been refinished and again every four months with a urethane polish. Check manufacturer specifications.
In the segment that follows, work gets underway on the second of two projects: creating a kitchen dish-cabinet that incorporates antique leaded-glass panels that the owners had purchased previously.

Important: Always dispose of toxic chemicals responsibly. Check the directions on the products for proper disposal methods. Some home centers may have chemical reclamation stations. Your local environmental agencies can provide you with helpful information as well.

Note: This is a summary of steps included in the procedures shown in this episode of Restoration Realities. There may be variations in procedures for your particular restoration project based on the types of materials you select and the nature or extent of your particular project. Always follow proper safety precautions, and read and follow manufacturer's guidelines, diagrams and safety notices that come with materials or products that you select.

Do It Yourself Tub, Tile
& Countertop Refinishing Kits

Don't Tear out that Old Tub, Rip Out that Old Tile or Replace that Old Cabinet or Countertop.
--
We Make the Entire Do It Yourself Refinishing Process simple, straight forward and easy to Do Yourself.
--

If You Can Paint, You Can Refinish.

 Everything* You Need to Refinish  3 - 4 Tubs, Surrounds, Countertops or Cabinets.

Total DIY project cost is about $200.00
vs.
 $ 450.00 - $775.00 to hire a contractor or
$1700 or much more to replace.


This entire project can be done in about 24 hours.


NOTE: Do it yourselfers can rent High Volume Low Pressure, HVLP, spray equipment from Graco or Wagner / Spraytech at most rental stores for about $35.
*
Except spray equipment which can be rented very inexpensively

Each Easy to Use DIY Refinishing Kit Includes:

2 quarts EP- Acrylic White Gloss Base

1 pint EP-Acrylic Catalyst (4 to 1)

1 quart EP-Acrylic Reducer MED

1 quart Ultra Primer Base

1 quart Ultra Primer Catalyst (1 to 1)

1 quart Ultra Primer Reducer

1/2 quart Chemical Adhesor - Blue

1 quart Step I Cleaner

1 quart Step II Cleaner

Product::   Do It Yourself Tub, Tile, Cabinet
& Countertop Refinishing Kit


1 STANDARD COLOR - 2 QUARTS

DIYR-716-IC

   
Description:   Don't Tear out that Old Tub, Rip out that Old Tile or Replace that Old Cabinet or Countertop.
We make the entire refinishing process simple and easy to Do Yourself.

Standard kit colors are gloss white,
china white, bone, almond, and clear.

Save over 70% vs. Replacement by utilizing our Do It Yourself Refinishing Process.

PLEASE NOTE: Our Refinishing Kits are sent via UPS - Hazardous Materials due to the Paint & Strippers. Therefore, shipping costs are higher than normal.

  spacer spacer
Price:   $199.00 $179.95 - On Sale !
Call Jimmy @ 713-679-4175 to Order
 
spacer

refinishing
Product::   Do It Yourself Tub, Tile, Cabinet
& Countertop Refinishing Kit


2 COLORS - MIXED
1 QUART CUSTOM COLOR
1 QUART STANDARD COLOR
spacer spacer

DIYR-716-IC - CUSTOM - 1

   
  spacer spacer
Description:   With the Mixed Color Option - You will receive 1 quart of a Standard Color and 1 Quart of a Custom Color.

Standard kit colors are gloss white,
china white, bone, almond, and clear.

We can Match Any Custom Color from the
Sherwin Williams Interior Color Chart

(www.sherwin-williams.com )

Perfect for multi-colored projects or a
Tub and a Counter / Appliance etc.

PLEASE NOTE: Our Refinishing Kits are sent via UPS - Hazardous Materials due to the Paint & Strippers. Therefore, shipping costs are higher than normal.

spacer spacer
Price:   $224.95 $194.95 - On Sale !
Call Jimmy @ 713-679-4175 to Order
 
spacer

Product::   Do It Yourself Tub, Tile, Cabinet
& Countertop Refinishing Kit


2 QUARTS CUSTOM COLOR
spacer spacer

DIYR-716-IC
CUSTOM

   
  spacer spacer
Description:  

We can match Any Color from the
Sherwin Williams Interior Color Chart

(www.sherwin-williams.com )

PLEASE NOTE: Our Refinishing Kits are sent via UPS - Hazardous Materials due to the Paint & Strippers. Therefore, shipping costs are higher than normal.

  spacer spacer
Price:   $224.95 $194.95 - On Sale !
Call Jimmy @ 713-679-4175 to Order
 
Use of this site is subject to certain Terms of Use which constitute a legal agreement
between You and StartRemodeling.com.
Our Disclaimer  Privacy Statement
-
A Christian Owned Site - Prayer and Faith are Powerful

We Proudly Serve all 50 states in the U.S.A.  StartRemodeling.com  We proudly serve Canada
1997 - 2014 All Rights Reserved

CustomerService@StartRemodeling.com


Revised: March 03, 2014

Refinishing@StartRemodeling.com
-

.........................................................................................................................................................

In this episode, DIY's Restoration Realities visits Atlanta, GA and the neighborhood of Grant Park where they help a young couple with a couple of projects in their 19th century Victorian.

In this second segment, work gets underway on the first of two projects: restoring and re-glazing an antique claw-foot tub.