Feng Shui  0

Posted on August 20th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

Feng Shui is an age-old practice that embraces the idea of living in harmony and balance with our environment. This ancient Chinese art stretches back over at least 7000 years. It is not only profoundly creative and intuitive, but it is also a science employing diagnostic equipment, mathematical formulas and specialized language.

Feng Shui literally means wind and water, two of the most fundamental forms of life’s energy.

The practice of Feng Shui embodies a belief that there are subtle forces in our surroundings that can impact upon our lives. It provides a framework for understanding the secrets of how energy moves in our surroundings and how the landscape, the style of our buildings and their interiors affect us at a subtle level. By applying the principles of this art, it is possible to make our living and working environments healthier and more attuned to the life forces which surround us. It is also possible to enhance our prosperity and minimize obstacles and misfortune.

“Traditional” or “Classical” Feng Shui has been used effectively by Feng Shui Masters for centuries. This method of Feng Shui involves a scientific, yet practical and common sense approach to creating balance to bring health, wealth and good fortune to a building’s occupants. The many formulas and techniques that are associated with this method are closely guarded secrets of the Masters and are traditionally handed down word of mouth from Master to student to keep the information pure. My teacher and mentor – Grand Master Yap Cheng Hai – has also developed proven systems for application and interpretation of these formulae through his many years of experience.Traditional Feng Shui considers the influence of direction, time, use of space and the influence of the external environment on the occupants. Recommendations are made to maximize the potential of the building and the environment to support and enhance the success of the occupants to help them reach their true potential.

 

Feng Shui is commonly applied to existing homes or businesses, but can also be extremely valuable when:

  • Selecting a home or business property;
  • Designing a building;
  • Designing an extension &/or renovating;
  • Placing furniture and or special objects in a room;
  • Selecting the best room for each occupant;
  • Selecting colors;

The way of Feng Shui is complex, yet it has the potential to significantly improve your life.

 

Feng Shui is commonly applied to existing homes or businesses, but can also be extremely valuable when:

  • Selecting a site for a home or business;
  • Establishing the best orientation for a building;
  • Designing a building;
  • Designing an extension;
  • Placing furniture and or special objects in a room;
  • Selecting the best room for each occupant;
  • Selecting colours;
  • Designing a garden.

The way of Feng Shui is complex, yet it has the potential to significantly improve our lives.

  0

Posted on August 16th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

You can find a lot of information on mold, but trying to understand it may be difficult to those who didn’t take biology and chemistry. Even after stumbling through the pronunciation of these words, not everyone can comprehend what was meant by the statement.

“Satratoxin, a low-molecular weight non-volatile organically derived agent, belongs to the macrocyclic trichothecene class of mycotoxins generated from fungal microorganisms.”

  As an aid to the homeowner, this overview is intended to explain a few bad products of mold in a less scientific manner. It will focus on those types of mold that have been considered as problematic to the “indoor mold issue” and does not address other fungal organisms which may behave differently. Analogies presented are not intended to be scientifically accurate, but rather to illustrate complex behaviors in more simple terms.

 

 

 

For mold, the root system is made up of hyphae (high-fee). As hyphae grows into a mass during the vegetative state,it becomes a mycelium (my-sill-ee-um). The spores, designed for reproduction, are similar to seeds.

Like a weed, mold needs food and water to survive (yes, both need more than that, however, we are simplifying things here). For mold, the food of preference is organic matter (things that once were living). Indoors, those things are wood, paper, organic dust and dirt, leather, skin flakes, body oils, etc.

When mold spores that are floating around in the air land on a food source, they sit there patiently waiting for water. If the item they land on should contain sufficient moisture, or water comes from another source (leaks, etc.), the spore germinates and hyphae grows. The hyphae branch out, secrete enzymes to breakdown the food, form the mycelium, and absorb nutrients to grow. As long as the food and water hold out, colonies will continue to grow. Note that individual hyphae and spores are very, very small and few can see them without a microscope. When you see visible mold, you are generally seeing that mass of mycelium.

Hyphae can intertwine into the fibers of the substrate, penetrating the pores. As it consumes the substrate, it can also create it’s own route by dissolving pathways into the material. This is one of the reasons it is so difficult to kill and/or clean up mold on organic substrates. If you remove the surface growth, those bits of hyphae within the substrate are ready for re-growth upon the return of moisture.

As the organism matures, it develops spores intended for reproduction. Spores vary in size, shape, weight and methods of distribution. Some are light and buoyant so they float easily through the air. Others are wet and sticky and may cling to insects, rodents, etc. as a mode of travel.

Volatile Organic Compounds

As mold “consumes” it’s food, the chemical reactions of enzymes, substrates and mold growth produce carbon dioxide, water, and volatile organic compounds (VOC’s). Because these items are a result of actions essential to the growth of the organism, they are classified as primary metabolites.

For mold, many types of VOC’s are produced and typically include aldehydes, alcohols, keytones, and hydrocarbons. They have complex structures and names like “2-methyl-1-propanol”, so if you are going to dig deeper into VOC’s, get ready for chemistry class.

They are called volatile in that they evaporate easily at room temperature and pressure. Fortunately, this volatility aids in dilution with fresh air to minimize concentrated build-up of these chemicals. Testing for VOC’s is often accomplished by using vacuum cylinders to obtain samples of the air with laboratory analysis obtained from sophisticated test instruments (gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer).

When you smell a “musty-moldy” odor, it’s generally the VOC’s you are noticing. VOC’s are often considered irritants to mucus membranes, however, are also capable of both short-term and long-term adverse health effects. If you do smell these odors, it’s a sure sign the mold is consuming and growing and you need to take action. (Note that VOC’s may also be derived from non-mold sources including natural materials used in cleaning agents.)

Toxins

Many molds are capable of producing compounds called mycotoxins which are toxic to other organisms, including people. Mycologists believe these toxins are produced as protection against competing organisms and therefore, humans are simply caught in the cross-fire of this fight for survival.

Since these toxins are not essential for growth, they are classified as secondary metabolites. Toxic secondary metabolites require extra work on the part of the organism so production does not occur at all times, or, with all types of mold.

Scientists have identified over 400 mycotoxins and unlike VOC’s, these compounds are usually non-volatile (don’t evaporate easily at room temperature and pressure). One strain of mold may produce multiple toxins and one type of toxin may be produced by multiple strains of mold. Research has indicated that the type of substrate (nutrients), the growing conditions, together with the species of mold, will impact which toxins are created.

Some of these toxic substances are considered extremely hazardous to people, unfortunately, quantified human dose-response data is limited. Lab and field studies have shown these compounds to produce severe toxic effects in both animals and humans and therefore, the general recommendation is to minimize exposure to potentially toxigenic mold. Symptoms from toxic exposure range from flu-like symptoms, skin rashes and lesions, bleeding, fatigue, difficulty breathing, depression, etc. to longer-term nerve and organ problems, altered immunity, and cancer.

Not all secondary metabolites are considered bad for people…the antibiotics such as penicillin have beneficial use. However, from the mycological standpoint, antibiotics are considered mycotoxins since they too are generated by mold to ward off microorganisms (i.e. competing bacteria).

When the organism is producing toxins, the toxins are known to be present in the cell wall of spores and hyphae. It’s relatively easy to test for spores and hyphae, however, testing these components to see if they contain toxins is significantly more complex. Whereas a single spore can be viewed under a microscope, identifying what compounds are contained in the cell wall is difficult.

In order to identify these toxic compounds, laboratories must have a sufficient quantity of toxin-containing spores and carefully process them through sophisticated and expensive equipment that is capable of isolating chemicals down to billionths of an gram (remember, mold spores are microscopic so what is contained within it’s cell wall is extremely small). This testing is made even more difficult since there are a few hundred toxins to analyze and the behavior of mold is such that a toxin-producing mold in the field doesn’t necessarily produce the same type and quantity of toxins in the lab.

Generally speaking, identifying a mold type that is known to be capable of producing toxins is sufficient information to warrant precautions and avoid exposure without submitting for toxic analysis. However, if trying to confirm specific adverse health effects, obtaining an analysis of both VOC’s and toxins can be beneficial but often expensive.

Randy Penn is an independent licensed real estate inspector (Texas #5491) who specializes in mold testing and specimen recovery. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering, is a member of the Indoor Air Quality Association, has invested hundreds of hours in researching and training on fungal microorganisms, has completed IAQA’s workshop on mold remediation and has provided mold related presentations to homeowners and real estate professionals.

Cabinet Boxes – Behind the Cabinet Door  0

Posted on August 15th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

 

First you should understand what lies behind the cabinet door—the cabinet box. Your response may be a smug, Duh! But cabinet construction can get complicated rather quickly. There’s more going on than you might think. It breaks down by:

  • Framed construction

  • Frameless construction

In framed cabinets, wood joinery holds the parts together. Horizontal rails and vertical stiles secure the door to the box. In frameless cabinets, special hardware fittings do both jobs. Because no rails or stiles block the way, frameless cabinets offer slightly easier access to their interiors.

You might be surprised to learn that solid wood rarely forms the cabinet box. It’s more often used in face frames and doors than in the larger side panel parts. That’s because it tends to warp—a special concern in the kitchen where the moisture level changes frequently. But in the doors, using multiple strips of lumber in a variety of sizes can reduce the warp factor. A “floating” panel might also be used. The panel floats because instead of being glued to the doorframe, its edges sit between wooden grooves, allowing the wood to move more freely with changes in the kitchen’s humidity.

Box materials typically contain wood chips, other wood by-products, and synthetic additives to make them especially strong and warp resistant.

Your options for box material include:

  • Plywood

  • Particleboard or furniture-grade flakeboard

  • Medium-density fiberboard

All have solid reputations for durability and screw-holding power, particularly plywood. Medium-density fiberboard has gained a following for its ability to be formed into door and drawer heads and other decorative features. Furniture-grade flakeboard offers a stronger alternative than particleboard, which you’ll pay the least for.

Often the door and box will be constructed of different materials. A cabinet door might be solid maple and the sides plywood covered with a maple veneer. The same finish would be applied to both, unifying the look. Or you may decide you want different tones on the door and the sides to add contrast.

You’ll want to make sure you know if the finish you like requires a certain base material, and you’ll want to check out examples of your manufacturer’s work. Beware of staples! Staples will pull apart. You want cabinets with thick panels that have been corner blocked and glued or fastened with screws.

 

 

Flooring Preparation  0

Posted on August 15th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

Subfloor:

The installer must be the final judge as to whether the sub-floor meets the following requirements. Not doing so may jeopardize the success of the installation.

  • The floor must be clean and free of any defects such as loose boards and squeaks due to improper installation of plywood on joists.
  • Concrete floors must be fully cured and dry. (Calcium Chloride count of ’3′ or less is recommended)
  • Moisture content in wood sub-floors must be 12% or LOWER.
  • Floor should be sound and flat with no voids greater than 3 inches. High spots must be ground off and low spots filled to make the floor flat (1/8″ in a 48″ length)
  • Moisture barrier should not be used over a wood or a wood product sub-floor.

Existing Flooring:

Flooring may be installed over most types of existing flooring such as linoleum, vinyl, wood, concrete or tile floors and ¼” non-padded direct glue-down commercial carpet. Wall-to-wall carpet should be removed and the sub-floor examined and repaired, if necessary, prior to installation. Please note the following:

  • If installing over vinyl, ensure that the vinyl is secure. Perimeter-glued vinyl should be inspected and stapled/secured to the sub floor to ensure integrity.
  • If installing over an existing wood floor, install the laminate flooring at right angles to the wood floor.
  • Creaking and loose floorboards must be secured by using screws.
  • Never use the foam underlayment with moisture barrier on wood floors or wood sub-floors.

Radiant Heat Sub-floors:

Flooring can be installed over all types of subfloors containing radiant heating systems if these guidelines are followed:

  • Follow the directions provided by the supplier or manufacturer of the floor heating system.
  • The concrete must be cured a minimum of 6 weeks.
  • Foam underlayment with moisture barrier must be used.
  • The heating system must be in operation 2 weeks prior to installation. Turn off the system or lower the temperature to between 55 and 65 degrees for two days prior to the installation of the floor.
  • Forty-eight hours after the installation, the heat may be gradually increased to the operating level desired, but not to exceed 85 degrees.
  • Moisture Barrier must always be used with concrete substrate.

Kitchen, Bath and other Potentially Wet Environment Installations:

Lay the foam underlayment and, if applicable, tape the edges together with duct tape. For installations over concrete, use the underlayment with moisture barrier which has a flap of plastic membrane on one edge. Lay the first row of foam with moisture barrier so that the plastic membrane flap extends out onto the sub floor. Then lay the second row of foam over the extended flap and tape the entire edge together with duct tape to provide a moisture barrier between the foam sections. Repeat this process as you continue the installation. It is very important to ensure that an adequate moisture barrier exists when installing Laminate over a concrete sub floor.

When installing the laminate flooring in a potentially wet environment (bath, kitchen, utility room, etc.), use color coordinated perimeter sealant to seal all of the cut edges and the expansion space. Cut the perimeter sealant tube applicator tip to obtain a ½” bead. Apply the sealant in a smooth, continuous bead around the perimeter of the floor. All cutouts (toilet flange, pipes, etc.) should be sealed, as well. Once the sealant has been applied, wet your finger and force the sealant into the expansion space and the other cutouts. If correctly applied the sealant should be approximately 1/16″ above the surface of the flooring. The installer should ensure that all exposed core surfaces are covered. Allow to dry for 72 hours.

Important Installation Tips:

  • Generally, a more beautiful installation can be achieved by installing the planks parallel to incoming light. In narrow rooms, install planks parallel to longer walls, regardless of the direction of the light.
  • Rooms larger than 1,000 square feet or 40 lineal feet must be installed with T-Molding near the center to allow for proper expansion. As the area of installation increases, additional expansion space needs to be allowed.
  • To minimize chipping, cut the planks so the saw teeth travel into the decorative face as they cut.
  • NOTE: The sawdust from cutting the planks contains Aluminum Oxide from the wear layer. This material can scratch the surface. If possible, do not saw the material in the same room as the install.
  • If properly glued, the planks should go together easily. Use the tapping block to help get the plank together but do not “bang” the boards together. Chipping or raising of the edges can occur if too much force is used.
  • Always work safely, taking precautions with power tools and other hazards.
  • Caution! Wood Dust! Sawing, sanding or machining wood products can produce wood dust that can cause a flammable or explosive hazard. Wood dust may cause lung, upper respiratory tract, eye and skin irritation. Some wood species may cause dermatitis and/or respiratory allergic effects.
  • Avoid contact with ignition sources.
  • Sweep or vacuum dust for recovery or disposal.
  • Avoid breathing of wood dust.
  • Avoid dust contact with eyes and skin.

FIRST AID: If inhaled, breathe fresh air immediately. In case of contact, flush eyes and skin with water. If irritation persists, call a physician.

Use of Transitions:

  • A transition is required in rooms larger than 1,000 square feet or if the floor is 40 or more lineal feet in length.
  • A transition should be used between rooms that have different environments, for example, between a kitchen and a utility room.
  • Use trim track for transitions that are attached to the sub floor to ensure adequate expansion. Do not nail secured transitions directly to the subfloor.

Home Improvement, Remodeling and Repair Contractor Complaints  0

Posted on August 13th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

For the first time since the beginning of the Consumer Federation of America consumer complaints survey, this year home improvement/home construction passed auto sales and auto repair as the top generator of consumer complaints.

This news confirms a long slide in consumer confidence in the building and construction industry. It also illustrates, once again, the lack of any governing body to regulate the remodeling/construction industry. We regulate Realtors who sell the new and previously owned houses, but we don’t regulate the people who build or improve them.

For years, homeowners have been telling me how difficult it is to even find anyone to work on some of the smaller jobs we all need to do around our homes. Here’s the problem: people who don’t have a lot of experience or expertise in construction or home maintenance are out there right now trying to work on these homes across the country. As a result, homeowners are finding that the jobs are not being completed to their satisfaction. Sometimes they are even prepaying for services that don’t get done.

This does not just apply to home improvement or handypersons working on small projects. New construction and new home building is generating just as many complaints. Too many homebuyers are only worried how many square feet or how big a house they can afford and not how the home is constructed and the quality of that construction. Trust me folks, the technology and products are out there now to build a home that is both energy efficient and low maintenance if the homebuyer and builder want to spend the time and money to build it that way. The problem today is homebuyers are more worried about what color carpeting they are going to install and the color scheme of the house rather than the walls and floors themselves.

There are ways to build a quality home but it takes a little more time and effort and – yes – a little more money, too. Let’s imagine two homes constructed side-by-side. One was constructed using all of the newest products and techniques available in the industry today and is 1,800 square feet. The second home, totaling 2,000 square feet, is built using less expensive materials and services, but acceptable under the code restrictions. Both houses may be the same price, but buyers seem to opt for the extra square footage and don’t seem to worry about the quality of construction.

Personally, I believe homebuyers would worry more about the construction quality if they were educated how a home really should be built as well as the great new products and services now available. Most home builders are aware of these facts, but are hesitant to build with this type of quality or expense because they aren’t convinced homebuyers want to spend that extra money for something they cannot see. The builders are also unconvinced because the products or services don’t add any extra square footage to the home. Many believe this is a “bottom line” for homeowners. This is a shame!

The problem, then, is twofold. If homebuyers will just quit buying cheaply made homes, the builders will be stuck with them and will be forced to stop building them. If builders will just build every home as if they were going to live there themselves, then perhaps homebuyers will have confidence their home purchase will not cost them an arm and a leg to maintain and fix each year.

We have to work both sides of the fence here. Homeowners need to be educated not only on how a home should be constructed but the products to use to make their home the quality purchase they expect. Likewise, home builders need to inform the buyers as to why they are building the home a certain way and why it is going to cost a little more than the one down the street.

In the coming weeks in this column, I will discuss how a home should be built and more importantly, how to hire a contractor or builder to do those building projects around your home as well as how to protect yourself from some of the ones that just really don’t know what they are doing.

~ Jimmy

Black Mold, Home Improvement, Remodeling and Repair Contractor Complaints  0

Posted on August 12th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

For the first time since the beginning of the Consumer Federation of America consumer complaints survey, this year home improvement/home construction passed auto sales and auto repair as the top generator of consumer complaints.

Contractor Tips

This news confirms a long slide in consumer confidence in the building and construction industry. It also illustrates, once again, the lack of any governing body to regulate the remodeling/construction industry. We regulate Realtors who sell the new and previously owned houses, but we don’t regulate the people who build or improve them.

For years, homeowners have been telling me how difficult it is to even find anyone to work on some of the smaller jobs we all need to do around our homes. Here’s the problem: people who don’t have a lot of experience or expertise in construction or home maintenance are out there right now trying to work on these homes across the country. As a result, homeowners are finding that the jobs are not being completed to their satisfaction. Sometimes they are even prepaying for services that don’t get done.

This does not just apply to home improvement or handypersons working on small projects. New construction and new home building is generating just as many complaints. Too many homebuyers are only worried how many square feet or how big a house they can afford and not how the home is constructed and the quality of that construction. Trust me folks, the technology and products are out there now to build a home that is both energy efficient and low maintenance if the homebuyer and builder want to spend the time and money to build it that way. The problem today is homebuyers are more worried about what color carpeting they are going to install and the color scheme of the house rather than the walls and floors themselves.

There are ways to build a quality home but it takes a little more time and effort and – yes – a little more money, too. Let’s imagine two homes constructed side-by-side. One was constructed using all of the newest products and techniques available in the industry today and is 1,800 square feet. The second home, totaling 2,000 square feet, is built using less expensive materials and services, but acceptable under the code restrictions. Both houses may be the same price, but buyers seem to opt for the extra square footage and don’t seem to worry about the quality of construction.

Personally, I believe homebuyers would worry more about the construction quality if they were educated how a home really should be built as well as the great new products and services now available. Most home builders are aware of these facts, but are hesitant to build with this type of quality or expense because they aren’t convinced homebuyers want to spend that extra money for something they cannot see. The builders are also unconvinced because the products or services don’t add any extra square footage to the home. Many believe this is a “bottom line” for homeowners. This is a shame!

The problem, then, is twofold. If homebuyers will just quit buying cheaply made homes, the builders will be stuck with them and will be forced to stop building them. If builders will just build every home as if they were going to live there themselves, then perhaps homebuyers will have confidence their home purchase will not cost them an arm and a leg to maintain and fix each year.

We have to work both sides of the fence here. Homeowners need to be educated not only on how a home should be constructed but the products to use to make their home the quality purchase they expect. Likewise, home builders need to inform the buyers as to why they are building the home a certain way and why it is going to cost a little more than the one down the street.

In the coming weeks in this column, I will discuss how a home should be built and more importantly, how to hire a contractor or builder to do those building projects around your home as well as how to protect yourself from some of the ones that just really don’t know what they are doing.

Clawfoot Tub Restoration  0

Posted on August 11th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

Clawfoot Tub Restoration From “Restoration Realities
episode DRTR-108

PHOTO
PHOTO

The Dougherty home in the Grant Park neighborhood of Atlanta.

 

Tools, materials and safety equipment:

High-volume low-pressure spray gun
Palm sander
Pipe wrenches
Screwdrivers
Channel-lock pliers
Crescent wrench
Drop cloths
Integrity Refinishing Coatings primer, EP-acrylic top coat
Paint buckets and paint stirrers
Stripper (Methylene Chloride)
Lacquer Thinner
Acid-etch cleaner for porcelain
Degreaser for porcelain
Bonding agent for porcelain
Coarse steel wool
Masking tape
Water hose and sprayer nozzle
240 grit sandpaper
Scouring pad
Plastic bags
Tape
Rags
Plumbers putty
Respirator mask with organic-vapor filters
Safety Glasses
Chemical-resistant gloves
Chemical-resistant suit

PHOTO

Reglazing a Tub

The worn surface of the Dougherties’ tub was actually painted with latex by former tenants, and the paint has begun to peel off. Aside from being unsightly and in improper surface for the tub, peeling paint presents a health-risk with small children in the home. Re-glazing the tub will involve removing the old paint, cleaning and degreasing the surface, adding a bonding primer and a gloss-finish coat of epoxy.

 

Paint removal is NOT necessary if the original manufacturers surface has not been painted over with any other type of paint.

 

  • Begin by shutting off both hot and cold water supplies (figure A).  
  • Loosen and disconnect water supply lines and drain line.  
  • Remove the tub to the garage or well vented location. Because cast-iron tubs like this typically weigh from 250 to 400 pounds, this part of the job requires several helpers (figure B).

 

 

  • Photo

    Figure A

     
    Photo

    Figure B

     

    NEW – Now you can purchase Mixed Colored Kits

    PHOTO

    For reglazing a tub, a respirator mask is required.
  • With the tub moved to a suitable work space, the stripping and re-glazing process can begin. Safety Alert: Because this process involves toxic chemicals and gives off fumes, this project should only be done outside or in a well-ventilated location, and appropriate safety precautions must be followed. In this case, protective eye-wear, chemical-resistant gloves, a respirator mask and full-coverage chemical resistant suit are all essential for proper safety. Your eyes and every part of your skin must be protected from these caustic chemicals. Respirator masks with organic-vapor filters must be used to avoid breathing harmful fumes.
     
  • Photo

    Figure C

     
    Photo

    Figure D

     
  • Photo

    Figure E

     
    Photo

    Figure F

     
  • Photo

    Figure G

     
    Photo

    Figure H

     
    PHOTO

    Figure I

    Important: Since the water runoff contains harmful chemicals, it’s critical that you handle and dispose of the waste water properly. Make sure there is drainage into some type of receptacle that can be carefully disposed of. Check with your local authorities on proper disposal. For our project, we fashioned a makeshift drain using a spare piece of guttering that emptied into a plastic bucket (figure I).

     

    PHOTO

    Figure J
  •     

  • The chemical cleaners and degreasers prepare the surface for a chemical bonding agent that will chemically react with the paint to form a tough, long lasting, factory finish for porcelain and tile. The first treatment in this process is application of an acid-etch cleaner. (Protective eyewear and chemical-resistant gloves are required.)  
  • Apply the acid-etch cleaner to the top edge of the tub (figure J) and allow it to run down over the surfaces.  
  • With a scouring pad or 240 grit sandpaper, scrub the tub with the acid-etch cleaner and then rinse with water.

  •  

    PHOTO

    Figure K
    PHOTO

    Figure L
  •     

  • You’re now ready to start the second step of the reglazing with the degreaser.  
  • Add a little water to moisten the tub surface, and pour degreaser in the tub. This cleaner actually helped clean the corrosion and dirt from the copper drain (figure K).  
  • Using another scouring pad, scrub away any residue.  
  • Rinse with water.  
  • To prepare for the next step, the adheser, cover any features of the tub that you won’t be painting. In our case, this meant covering the metal claw-feet (figure L).

  •  

    PHOTO

    Figure M
    PHOTO

    Figure N
    PHOTO

    Figure O
  •     

  • The adheser is a bonding agent. Spray on a light film of the chemical adheser (figure M).  
  • Allow to set up according to the manufacturer’s instructions. In our case, the set-up time was 10 to15 minutes.  
  • The next step is the primer. In our case the primer had to be mixed 1 part base to 2 parts reducer (figure N). This makes it possible to use in a paint sprayer. Mix thoroughly before placing the mixture into the sprayer.  
  • Using a paint-spray gun, prime the tub, inside and out, with three light coats of primer.  
  • Allow each coat to tack up about 15 minutes before the next coat is applied.  
  • Paint-Sprayer Tip: When spraying, continually move the gun. Never allow it to set in one place (figure O).

  •  

     

    Photo

    Figure P

     
    Photo

    Figure Q

     

     

    Photo

    Figure R

     
    Photo

    Figure S

     
    PHOTO
    PHOTO
    PHOTO

    The Grant Park neighborhood in Atlanta.

     

  • The finish coat of paint is next. In our case, to use the sprayer, we mixed together a ratio of 4 parts glossy-white base to one part catalyst and two parts reducer (or thinner). We then mixed thoroughly and poured the mixture into the spray reservoir (figure P).  
  • Again with a spray gun, apply three to four light coats of a final paint-coat (figure Q), allowing each coat to tack up about 15 minutes before the next coat is applied.
  • Once the paint is completely dry, move the tub back into the bathroom (figure R), install the tub drain and reinstall the plumbing fixtures on refinished tub. Move into position to hookup water lines.  
  • Size and cut drain pipe. Slide the connections together (figure S) and test.  
  • Mark water line size. Use the pipe bender and form the bend to the fixture.  
  • Hook up the compression fittings and test.

Additional Tips on Re-Glazing a Tub

 

  • Do not use your re-glazed tub for the specified number of days or hours recommended by the manufacturer — usually 24 hours.  
  • Do not lay objects on your newly re-glazed tub. Soap, washcloths, and shampoo bottles can ruin the finish.  
  • Avoid abrasive cleansers. Use a spray cleaner along with a soft cloth. Wiping the tub down with a cloth after each use can also help maintain the finish.  
  • Avoid bath mats with suction cups underneath.  
  • Maintain caulking around the tub.  
  • Some manufacturers recommend waxing your re-glazed tub after it has been refinished and again every four months with a urethane polish. Check manufacturer specifications.

In the segment that follows, work gets underway on the second of two projects: creating a kitchen dish-cabinet that incorporates antique leaded-glass panels that the owners had purchased previously.

Important: Always dispose of toxic chemicals responsibly. Check the directions on the products for proper disposal methods. Some home centers may have chemical reclamation stations. Your local environmental agencies can provide you with helpful information as well.

Note: This is a summary of steps included in the procedures shown in this episode of Restoration Realities. There may be variations in procedures for your particular restoration project based on the types of materials you select and the nature or extent of your particular project. Always follow proper safety precautions, and read and follow manufacturer’s guidelines, diagrams and safety notices that come with materials or products that you select.

Toxic Black Mold Victims Can Save Their Homes With the Right Knowledge  0

Posted on August 11th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

Black Mold Clean Up can be a Do It Yourself Project for those that can’t afford to hire a Professional or are avid do it yourselfers. StartRemodeling.com, the Largest Toxic Black Mold, Remodeling and Home Improvement Website on the Internet, offers Education, Protection and Permanent Solutions to Eliminate Black Molds from Your Life.

RemodelingGuy w/ Mold in his Shower

Is it toxic black mold or mold that’s black? Stachybotrys and many other strains of toxic, health threatening molds are becoming everyday household words in America that very few understand. Now the public can find informative and educational content, free mold brochures, toxic mold inspectors and remediation/abatement companies, toxic mold/tort attorneys and much more at one great location on the Internet. www.StartRemodeling.com.

Horror stories are pouring in by the thousands everyday. Families are being forced out of their homes for months on end. Some are burning them down to rid themselves of the problem. Schools and businesses are being shut down. Mr. and Mrs. John T. America are becoming seriously ill, young children and the elderly are severely sick and/or dying from this mysterious and little understood airborne toxin attacking their respiratory system.

Why? Because this epidemic, although around for millions of years, is brand new to most and just becoming public knowledge. Very few professionals, including doctors, have taken the time to study up on and train themselves about the problem at hand, much less educate the general population about the dangers that exist in their everyday lives. The simplest thing in the world and something we should all be able to take for granted has been tainted. The air we breathe inside of our homes and workplace.

Since 1997, StartRemodeling.com has been a driving force on the Internet to educate and provide quality resources to homeowners wanting to improve their homes inside and out. In the last few years, they and their sister site at www.ToxicMoldUSA.com have made it their #1 goal to inform, educate and provide life long solutions to their visitors on how to live safely inside of their homes.

StartRemodeling.com has done the research, compiled the information and is making it readily available to everyone. They provide everything from informative articles and news releases, to government and medical findings. They provide a free national search for pre-qualified and certified toxic black mold professionals to inspect for and eliminate toxic black mold, toxic tort attorneys to assist those that may be in need of their services and simple do it yourself mold kits for under $10. They also provide a free 50+ page brochure from the site that details everything from simple identification to insurance procedures, cleaning procedures and elimination. They’ve covered it all.

“This is something that I take very personally,” states Jimmy McDonald, the man who initiated the change in direction for the site. “I am a fairly new Grandfather and my Granddaughter became violently ill when she was only a couple of months old.”

“We found the problem to be an accumulation of Stachybotrys and Penicillium molds in the house she was visiting, which ended up in her lungs. The people in that house, friends of the family, were moved out of their home for the better part of a year, lost cherished valuables and life in general was turned completely upside down for them. That opened my eyes and made me want to come up with some solutions that all of us can apply to our everyday lives.”

“Our site does that and more for people now and it feels great.”

For the health of it.

###

Home Improvement Top 10  0

Posted on August 11th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

1. Establish a good working rapport with your Contractor.

2. Maintain open lines of communication with your contractor.

3. Understand the workings of your budget.

4. Try to quantify your extras before your contractor hires the subcontractors..

5. Clear all of your valuables and belongings from the work area to avoid
unnecessary accidents.

6. Do not criticize unfinished work.

7. Understand and prepare for your payment requirements so that
commitments can be maintained with suppliers.

8. Clear all access routes for ease and safety – it will save you
time and money.

9. Make all design choices as soon as possible to avoid delays and expedite the work.

10. Make all decisions with your contractor only to avoid miscommunications and confusion on the site.

For more info visit: The home Renovation Guide http://www.homerenovationguide.com

An Energy-Smart Deal On Home Heating & Cooling  0

Posted on August 11th, 2008. About , Black Mold, For Sale By Owner, Home Improvement.

If you’re getting ready to build a home, renovate your present house, or just replace your heating and cooling system, there are several things you can do to ensure you’ll get a smart deal.

Ask your builder, installer or home supply outlet about the EnergyGuide label and the fact sheets or product directories for each system you’re considering.

Compare the energy efficiencies and operating costs of competing models.

Consider both the purchase price and estimated operating costs when you decide what to buy.

Before you buy

1. Conduct an energy audit. This will help you detect energy waste, gauge the efficiency of your current heating and cooling systems, and determine if conditioned air is being distributed properly. Your utility company may offer free or low-cost energy audits or a do-it-yourself kit. You also can hire a specialist to do a more comprehensive B and more expensive B energy audit.

2. Weatherize your home. Check the caulking, weatherstripping and insulation, and make any necessary repairs. This may enable you to install a smaller, less expensive heating or cooling system to get the same results.

3. Compare the performance of different brands and models. Study the product literature. Will the product do the job? How energy efficient is it? What’s its repair history? Will it handle your needs today? Ten years from now? Does it fit your budget?

4. Estimate how much the appliance will cost to operate. The more energy an appliance uses, the more it costs to run. Consult the Energy Guide labels, the manufacturers’ fact sheets or the industry association directory to compare the energy efficiency of different models. The difference on your monthly utility bill can be significant, especially when considered over the lifetime of the product. You can save money over the long run by choosing a more energy-efficient model, even if it costs more initially.

5. Ask about special energy efficiency offers. Ask your local utility or salesperson if there are cash rebates, low-interest loans or other incentive programs in your area for buying energy-efficient products — and how you can qualify.

How do you say “efficiency”?

Heating and air conditioning systems have a language all their own…

· If you’re referring to furnaces and boilers, it’s”annual fuel utilization efficiency,” or AFUE.

· For room air conditioners, it’s”energy efficiency ratio,” or EER.

· For central air conditioners and heat pump cooling, it’s “seasonal energy efficiency ratio,” or SEER.

· For heat pump heating, it’s “heating seasonal performance factor,” or HSPF.

Choose from Full RSS or comments RSS feeds.
Welcome to our StartRemodeling.com Blog is powered by WordPress 3.5.1 and delivered to you in 0.375 seconds.
Design by Matthew. Administrator login and new user registration.